This asset is part of a series

Next >>

Used in pathways:

Orlando by Meredith Nadeau,

Key scenes and themes in Orlando by Rebecca Reeves,

Orlando by Tung Mac,

Intertextuality in Orlando

An investigation of the intertexuality in Orlando by James Anderson,

Orlando and it\'s Intertextuality by Georgina Cranmer,

Orlando by Faiqa Ahmed-Khan,

Intertextuality in Orlando

Orlando by Sarah Fivash,

Intertextuality in Orlando: gender fluidity and the re-shaping/accentuasion of themes and essence.

Orlando by Daniel Leggett,

Intertextual Nature of Orlando by Meredith Veach,

a look into the production design and the obvious themes of gender vs identity and the need to conform to society.

Orlando the novel to Orlando the film: Intertextuality and gender by Briony Stas, Student

Thoughts on how Sally Potter used the visual medium of film to translate Virginia Wolf's literary exploration of gender, which is given to us largely through Orlando's internalised thought, into the screen.

Reflection on Orlando\\\'s intertextual reality by Paul Numann, Student

Some explanations for Potter's decision on certain locations, set and costume design, and focusing on cinematography.

Gender in Orlando by Amelia Jefferies, Student

The gender of Orlando by Maria Moller Kjeldgaard, Student

Orlando\'s Look Directly At The Camera by Stephanie Hirlemann, Student

I compiled various assets about how Orlando looks at the camera. While I was watching the film, I noticed that it was a specific stylistic choice. By sifting through the documents, this knowing look from Orlando meant to address the viewers. In Sally Potter's commentary, she explains the direct look exemplifies a “kind of release… a kind of flying out of the historical period right into the present moment." These random moments when Orlando looks at the camera brings a sense of knowing and feeling that the viewers can relate to.

Narrative Voice in Orlando by Harriet Taberner, Student

Initially, Sally Potter had the narrative of Orlando living each moment as the present. For instance Orlando in 1592, tells the story as if it were 1592; the Orlando in 1700 tells the story as if it were 1700, etc. However, later this changed and bore more resemblance to Virginia Woolf's prose. The film took on the structure of memories, the present being 1992. Therefore, the narrative of the film did not alter with the aging/ developing of character. The narrator of the film is the female mother Orlando, and thereby tone and language differs from the language of a young boy. In the part of "Death" we can see many differences between Potter's shooting script and the finalized version in her process of adapting Virginia Woolf's novel "Orlando".

My Default Pathway by Karolina Obrecka, Student

My Default Pathway by Peter Sutton, MA Student

Costumes in Orlando by Andrea Paul, MA Student

Role transformation reflected through costumes

FH&H by Martha Diaz, Student

Orlando's Direct Address by Taylor McCausland, Student

An exploration of how Sally Potter's use of direct-to-camera address in Orlando functions as a way of adapting Woolf's literary voice to the screen.

Description Black and white A4 Text Document, Digital, Finished screenplay as published by Faber and Faber
Asset ID SPA0000210
Date 05/04/1994
Scene Number 1