Used in pathways:

\'Orlando\' - Pathway 1 by Julian Nshuro,

History by Abigail Stevens,

My pathway engages the theme of history in both the novel and the film. The four centuries through which Orlando lives provide an evocative and symbolic background for the story.

Orlando by Hanna Ibraheem,

The adaptation of 'Orlando' from literature to novel, and how each type shows the transgression from male to female

Orlando- A film by Sally Potter based on the novel by Virginia Woolf by Lidia Buonaiuto,

Reflect upon and illustrate the process of adapting Virginia Woolf's 1928 novel, Orlando, to film.

orlando by Georgia Beverton,

orlando by Georgia Beverton,

orlando to orlando by Jeanne le Roux,

the process of adapting the essence of orlando from literature to film.

Orlando and intertextuality by Sam O'Sullivan,

Exploring the intertextual nature of Sally Potter\'s Orlando

Sally Potter\'s Orlando and Intertexuality by Corey Hill,

Orlando by Tasha Loch,

Exploring the intertextual nature of Sally Potter's film, Orlando

The Orlando Adaptation by Harry Ryan,

The intertextual nature of Sally Potter's film adaptation of Orlando (1992)

Intertextuality in Orlando by Adam Field,

Orlando by Faiqa Ahmed-Khan,

Intertextuality in Orlando

Orlando\'s Intertextual Nature with regards to Potter\'s casting choices. by Yasmin Coutain-Springer,

Looking at Orlando through the realm of casting, trying to understand the significance of casting Swinton and Crisp in the film.

Orlando by Hannah Burbach,

let's see what happens

Orlando by Daniel Leggett,

Gender & Identity - Intertextuality in Orlando by William Innes,

An exploration of intertextuality in Orlando through themes of gender and identity. I have chosen this approach as the most obvious, yet complex and interesting theme in Sally Potter's and Virginia Woolf's work. Same person/Same story. No difference. Just a different sex/Just a different medium.

Orlando: Book to Movie by Andrew White,

As part of my Film Studies course, I will be using various strands of investigation into how a very personal piece of literature can be re-moulded into an equally personal film project. At the moment I have no clear strategy but as I work my way through this domain, I will attempt to make a coherent pathway that will enable me (and anyone else foolish enough to tread in my footprints) to make some sense of the transference from paper to celluloid

Intertextual Nature of Orlando by Meredith Veach,

a look into the production design and the obvious themes of gender vs identity and the need to conform to society.

Intertextuality in \\\'Orlando\\\' by Sarah Aksland,

Looking at Sally Potter\'s film version of Virginia Woolf\'s novel, \'Orlando,\' specifically regarding it\'s intertextual nature. When Tilda Swinton and Sally Potter were being interviewed at the BFI, they both talked about how passionate they were about creating Orlando the film, and they hoped that they could replicate the way the novel made them feel and succesfully represent this on film. As discussed in a seminar, one person's 'feelings' about a novel can vastly differentiate from another's (usually hindering the audience's enjoyment because they did not feel the same), so, when translating a medium from novel to film, which idea will resonate with all? Potter has chosen the ideas 'death' and 're-birth.' What is also interesting, is that a screenwriter will usually begin a script perhaps not totally aware of their controlling idea. Therefore, is the key to succesfully adapting a novel to film finding the 'controlling idea' of a novel and reproducing it cinematically?

Potter and Woolf by Ada Teistung,

Intertextuality in, and adaptation of Orlando.

CD, SP-ARK, NFT1 by Charles Drazin,

The Living Archive The great joy of archives is the way that they allow you to see behind the facade, to bring alive the thinking that resulted in the documents. For this reason, I find notes such as this irresistible. In their immediacy, they help you get into the mind of the artist more than the work itself. The finished painting, book or film is as much a process of hiding as revealing. But if you come across notes such as these in an archive, then you begin to get that wonderful sense of being able to see all.

My Pathway by Ally Margolis,

My Default Pathway by Lucille Gaudin, Student

Orlando: Adaption, by Stevie Christian, Student

The casting of Vita Sackville-West and Tilda Swinton in book and film by Adam Plummer, Student

I am interested in comparing what Vita Sackville-West signifies in Virginia Woolf\\\'s \\\'biography\\\', with what Tilda Swinton signifies in Sally Potter\\\'s film.

Orlando the novel to Orlando the film: Intertextuality and gender by Briony Stas, Student

Thoughts on how Sally Potter used the visual medium of film to translate Virginia Wolf's literary exploration of gender, which is given to us largely through Orlando's internalised thought, into the screen.

My Default Pathway by Charles Tirella, Student

The gender of Orlando by Maria Moller Kjeldgaard, Student

The Idea of Gender as a Performance by James Kruglinski, Student

Both Virginia Woolf and Sally Potter are interested in exploring the duality of gender through the story of Orlando. Is a person's sex something that is fixed? Are men and women really that different? Perhaps gender is not something that has already been predetermined. Rather, Woolf and Potter propose that it's an ideology “that has been reinforced by tradition, inheritance and convention”. Both the novel and the film use Orlando’s sex change as an opportunity to explore and discover the answer to this issue.

The way in which Sally Potter intertextually represents the idea of gender through \'The Eternal Recurrence\' found in the original novel, by way of visual expression. by Maxwell Gutteridge, Student

The way in which Sally Potter intertextually represents the idea of gender through ' The Eternal Recurrence' found in the original novel, by way of visual expression.

Orlando\'s Look Directly At The Camera by Stephanie Hirlemann, Student

I compiled various assets about how Orlando looks at the camera. While I was watching the film, I noticed that it was a specific stylistic choice. By sifting through the documents, this knowing look from Orlando meant to address the viewers. In Sally Potter's commentary, she explains the direct look exemplifies a “kind of release… a kind of flying out of the historical period right into the present moment." These random moments when Orlando looks at the camera brings a sense of knowing and feeling that the viewers can relate to.

Voyeurism and the Camera\'s Point of View by Heather Wakeman, Student

My pathway contains assets that explore the point of view of the camera and the placement of the camera as a voyeur. It evolved from a note that Sally Potter wrote on her shooting script: "The camera as a voyeur--behind something." From this note, I decided to find other assets that highlight a voyeuristic placement of the camera and thus the audience. My assets range from the camera positioning in intimate scene to Potter describing her use of character address in her director's commentary.

My Default Pathway by Harveen Panesar, Student

\\\\\\\'I am rooted, but I flow\\\\\\\' -Conceptions of time and the conveyance of inner life in \\\\\\\'Orlando\\\\\\\' by Maire Connor, Student

The central impulse of this pathway is to provide a conduit through which one may explore how the passing of time is expressed within Sally Potter's 1992 film 'Orlando', as a prominent theme of both the original novel and film. Furthermore, in acknowledgement of the disparities between the manner in which a visual medium and a written work respectively convey meaning, one is also drawn to the cinematic techniques utilised to communicate the eponymous hero/ine's inner thoughts, feelings and frustrations. The titular quotation, lifted from another of Woolf's novels, 'The Waves' is appropriated here to reflect upon the process of adaptation, particularly the ever-mutating, palimpsestic nature of a text (Woolf 2005: 86).

Orlando from Novel to Film by Rea Anastasopoulou, Student

Pathway to reflect upon and illustrate the process of adapting Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel, Orlando, to film.

Gender and Sexuality in Orlando by Melanie Allickson, Student

Cinematography and Shot Analysis in Orlando by Jake Stickley, Student

An analysis of the relationship between the detailed and highly illustrative description within the original text and the shot choices and cinematography of the film adaptation. The approach of this pathway will be to seek connections between the various texts available to form a progressive train of thought, concluding with an assessment of the success of the translation of Woolf's work to the screen.

Representations Of Gender in Orlando. by Nicholas Subramaniam, Student

Exploring the representation of gender, through character, actors and costume in the adaptations of Orlando.

My Default Pathway by Jasmine Ye, Student

My Default Pathway by Emam Awad, Student

The Royal Pathway by Emily Nabasny, MA Student

My Default Pathway by Peter Sutton, MA Student

The Fluidity of Voice: Changing Gender Expectations Through Song by Carrie Barnhouse, MA Student

This pathway traces the use of the falsetto in Orlando as a symbol of transformation/alteration in gendered meanings through its position as herald throughout the narrative. The voice acts as construct for the subsequent reversal of bodily gender norms. It highlights periods of transition or translation for Orlando.

Costumes in Orlando by Andrea Paul, MA Student

Role transformation reflected through costumes

EDITED: Costumes in Orlando by Andrea Paul, MA Student

My Default Pathway by Karl McCool, Student

My Default Pathway by Carmel Curtis, Student

Orlando's Direct Address by Taylor McCausland, Student

An exploration of how Sally Potter's use of direct-to-camera address in Orlando functions as a way of adapting Woolf's literary voice to the screen.

The female and the other by Easmanie Michel, Student

The female consciousness throughout the film. Orlando supports the poet because of his otherness

Potter-Elizabeth-Crisp by Ethan Gates, Student

Description Video file, Digital, Selected Scene Commentary by Sally Potter
Asset ID SPA0000415
Date 1992
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